Summary: Information about our policy on allocation of blocks of static IP addresses.
  1. IP Block Allocation - General Policy
  2. Changing Products
  3. Additional IP Addresses
  4. Procedure for Allocating IP Blocks
  5. Guidance for IP Requirements
  6. Non-Valid Requests

1. IP Block Allocation - General Policy

The table below shows the default IP allocation for our broadband products.

Currently sold products
Account type Default IP type Switch between static and dynamic? Multiple IPs available?
Residential products Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Business products Dynamic Yes Yes
SDSL Dynamic Yes Yes
Previously sold products
Plusnet Essentials / Essentials Fibre Dynamic No No
Plusnet Unlimited Fibre Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Plusnet Value Dynamic No No
Plusnet Extra Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Plusnet Pro Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Plusnet Premium Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Unlimited Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Plusnet Essential Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Broadband Your Way (all options) Dynamic Yes - £5 setup charge No
Broadband Plus Dynamic No No
Broadband Premier (all Options) Static No No
Broadband PAYG, Home Lite, Home Surf Static No No
Business Options 1-3 Dynamic Yes Yes
SDSL Dynamic Yes Yes
Business Static No Yes
Small Business Static No Yes
Teleworker Static No Yes
Homeworker/Biz Surf Static No Yes

Where switching between static and dynamic is allowed, this can be requested through My Account at any time.

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2. Changing Products

Most product changes will mean keeping the same IP address, the following exceptions should be noted:

  • Changing from Home Surf to any other product will change the IP address.
  • Changing from a residential to business or business to residential will change the IP address.
  • Changing from product that has a dynamic IP address to a product that doesn't will change the IP to a static IP address.
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3. Additional IP Addresses

Where blocks are available, customers can request 4, 8 or 16 IP addresses by raising a Ticket using the Help Assistant. We do not provide any blocks large than 16. The exceptions to this are customers on Biz Surf.

4 IP Block /30

  • A 4 IP block provides 2 usable IP addresses (1 for the router and 1 for servers, PC, etc.)
  • The customer must justify why they need an additional 1 static IP address
  • No RIPE form is required for a 4 IP block and this can be authorised by our Customer Support Team

8 IP Block /29

  • An 8 IP block provides 6 usable IP addresses (1 for the router and 5 for servers, PC, etc.)
  • A RIPE form is required and must be attached to the Ticket, this can be created at the Usertools RIPE Form page. An example form is available to show how it is completed.
  • The customer must justify why they need an 8 IP block rather than a single IP or 4 block.
  • An 8 IP block can be authorised by our Customer Support Team.

16 IP Block /28

  • A 16 IP block provides 14 usable IP addresses (1 for the router and 14 for servers, PC, etc.).
  • A RIPE form is required and must be attached to the Ticket, this can be created at the Usertools RIPE Form page. An example form is available to show how it is completed.
  • The customer must justify why they need a 16 IP block rather than a single IP, 8 block or 4 block.
  • A 16 IP block must be authorised by our network services team and entered into the RIPE Map.
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4. Procedure for Allocating IP Blocks

In order to allocate the IP blocks to a customer, the following process should be followed:

  • Within the customer's Workplace account add the relevant IP block size.
  • Within the account details screen, activate the new IP block component. Copy the IP Address and Subnet Mask address details into your clipboard.
  • Unconfigure the old Static IP and destroy it.
  • Close the customer Ticket with the following:
Dear Customer, Your new IP block has now been allocated.


Your new IP settings will take effect from the next time you connect with your DSL router.


You have been assigned the following addresses:

IP Address: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Subnet Mask: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
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5. Guidance for IP Requirements

Requirements for IP address blocks will vary. An IP block may be required by a user who cannot perform a desired task using NAT / Port Forwarding. Some common examples are provided below, but discretion must be exercised to ensure the correct decision is made:

Valid IP requirements:

Any protocol or service which accepts inbound connections and runs on more than 5 ports, or is needed to be run on more than one machine. E.g:

  • Certain online games, (e.g. where the customer wants to play the same online game on more than one PC simultaneously on his connection or where people have, for example, 2 X-boxes that they wish to use simultaneously).
  • VPN applications, many of which do not run correctly over NAT or require specialist NAT equipment.
  • Hosting of the same service on more than one machine (ie Voice over IP telephone applications or amateur radio applications which accept inbound connections)
  • Hardware Firewalls, designed to offer better network security.
  • Webservers on multiple platforms.
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6. Non-Valid Requests:

  • Hosting of multiple websites from the same webserver - this can be done using virtual hosting. However, if someone wants to host multiple SSL websites then this is a valid reason - as you cannot use virtualhosts with SSL.
  • Hosting of different services on different servers, i.e. 1 webserver, 1 FTP server and 1 Linux ssh shell server. Port forwarding would allow users to forward the relevant port on the right machine, all from the same IP.
  • Hosting of SMTP email alone.
  • In some cases, customers can use non standard ports for their private servers - This is to be encouraged.

Where an IP block request is refused, the agent refusing the request must provide details to the customer as to how their requirements can be met using NAT, providing links to external resources to assist where possible.

Further Documentation and example forms can be found at RIPE.net

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Policy Changes

We will list changes to the policy as they occur, to make it easier for you to see if and how the policy has altered since you last read it.

Date Change Summary
2nd July 2007 Policy first published
11th December 2008 Policy updated
17th February 2009 Policy updated
21st January 2009 Policy updated
12th April 2010 Policy updated
6th February 2012 Policy updated
17th January 2013 Policy updated
29th May 2013 Policy updated

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